Seniors: Essay resources

Hi Seniors,

This post will be a compilation of resources you can (um, should?) use in writing your Orwell essay. For starters, here’s a digital copy of the research guide I handed out in class on Thursday: Using online journals for research

Here’s the citing guide I handed out in class last Thursday: MLA Format Guide for Essays

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Seniors: Presentations

Today we heard from the Post-Colonial and Feminist groups. Nice work to both of them — I think we came away with a much better understanding of those lenses and how to apply them to Macbeth.

The other four groups are slated for tomorrow. We’re gonna start right away, so make sure you’re ready to go when you come in. I had some trouble connecting to the internet on my laptop today, so be prepared in case of emergency.

Seniors: Learning and applying literary theory

Hi seniors,

Here’s the post from last week that explains what needs to be done for tomorrow. Here’s a copy of the rubric as well:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/hm4ofjn9259uruj/Lit%20theory%20presentation%20rubric.docx?dl=0

We’re beginning our presentations right at the beginning of class tomorrow. We’ll go in alphabetical order.

_____________________________________

For next week your group will need to present on a specific literary theory and how it applies to Macbeth and the short story we read in class today: “Tomorrow and Tomorrow and So Forth” by John Updike.

Like I demonstrated in class today, you’ll need to explain to the class the tenets of your literary theory, lead us in a guided reading of the short story, and explain how we can apply this theory to Macbeth. (Give a couple specific examples but don’t feel like you need to talk about every instance in the book.)

Finally, explain to us why this theory works well for viewing Macbeth, or if it’s a bit of a stretch.

The resources I handed out in class can be found here, but you’ll need to do your own research too and dive deeper into the theory.

I’d like to do the presentations on Tuesday.

Here are the groups once again:

Gender/Queer theory
Vanessa, Kayden, Vivian, Phuong, Nelson

Feminist
Liz, Ludwing, Amanda, Christian

Post-colonial
Yen, Kendrick, Dat, Brittany

Marxist
Elvin, Alex, Duc, Sarah C.

Psychoanalytic/Freudian
Peter, Nikolle, Sabrina, Sashary, Nishali

Jungian
Leslie, Emmy, Sara V., Brianna

Seniors: Learning and applying literary theory

For next week your group will need to present on a specific literary theory and how it applies to Macbeth and the short story we read in class today: “Tomorrow and Tomorrow and So Forth” by John Updike.

Like I demonstrated in class today, you’ll need to explain to the class the tenets of your literary theory, lead us in a guided reading of the short story, and explain how we can apply this theory to Macbeth. (Give a couple specific examples but don’t feel like you need to talk about every instance in the book.)

Finally, explain to us why this theory works well for viewing Macbeth, or if it’s a bit of a stretch.

The resources I handed out in class can be found here, but you’ll need to do your own research too and dive deeper into the theory.

I’d like to do the presentations on Tuesday.

Here are the groups once again:

Gender/Queer theory
Vanessa, Kayden, Vivian, Phuong, Nelson

Feminist
Liz, Ludwing, Amanda, Christian

Post-colonial
Yen, Kendrick, Dat, Brittany

Marxist
Elvin, Alex, Duc, Sarah C.

Psychoanalytic/Freudian
Peter, Nikolle, Sabrina, Sashary

Jungian
Leslie, Emmy, Sara V., Brianna

Seniors: More Christian literary theory

We continued our theme of looking at Macbeth through Christian literary theory, beginning class with a reading that emphasized one of the main problems of using this lens on Macbeth: it’s just too simplistic.

Here’s a link to the article:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/eoja39xr16dfvqv/Macbeth%20Christianity%20notes.docx?dl=0

On Monday we’ll start with your group giving an example of where we see a reference or allusion to Christian theology or history in your assigned scene. We got a good example in class today when Peter’s group (with an assist from Leslie and someone else – sorry I forgot who!) showed that the line about the bell that “summons [Macbeth] to heaven or hell” (II.i.62) connects well to the chain of being we learned about yesterday. Obviously, killing someone (especially with a divine connection like a king) would send Macbeth to hell, but if Macbeth is able to take the throne, then he’d go to heaven because he’d be king and therefore also divine. Make sense?

Not every scene will have lines as easy to spot as that, but they all will have some references. Even things like calling the king “Your Grace” or “My lord” would fit in with this idea.

Start thinking about your response paper for Tuesday. Here are a couple ideas if you’re still looking for something to write about:

-Christian theology and Macbeth
-Macbeth’s “full” destiny from the witches
-Macbeth’s obsession with other peoples’ families (Banquo and Macduff)
-Macbeth’s bad trip
-“He shall spurn fate, scorn death, and bear/His hopes ‘bove wisdom, grace and fear./And you all know, security/is mortals’ chiefest enemy” (III.v.30)
-Banquo’s murder

Seniors: Banquo’s ghost

Today we finally finished III.iv – the scene where Banquo’s ghost comes back to haunt Macbeth. Read that if you missed class. We also watched Roman Polanski’s version of the scene, which does a great job of illustrating the setting and the reactions of the crowd that watches Macbeth react to seeing Banquo’s ghost.

For your second response paper, which is due tomorrow, there are a few ideas you can hone in on:

-New Historicism: how did the context of the times (and Shakespeare’s writing environment) impact how the play was written and our response to it?
-Freudian stuff: Is Banquo’s ghost real, or is it just a manifestation of Macbeth’s guilt-wracked mind?
-Manliness: why is Lady Macbeth always talking about gender?
-Supernatural: are there really supernatural forces at work here, or is it just because the characters themselves are supernatural that they keep talking about it?