From Mythology to Modern Day

Today we’re going to look at how old myths, folktales and legends became a few of the superheroes we know today. We’re going to study a few specific ones today: Superman, Wonder Woman, Thor, Shazam!/Captain Marvel and The Thing.

First, make sure your group reads the original myth, folktale or legend. Then read the comic version.

On a sheet of chart paper, compare/contrast the superhero to the original story.
1) First, explain whether or not this superhero comes from a myth, folktale or legend
2)Evaluate how much the modern day superhero resembles the myth/folktale/legendary character — talk about each one’s “super powers”
3) How has the superhero updated the myth/folktale/legendary character for a modern audience?
4) As other groups present, make sure you fill out your superhero/myth comparison chart.

Superman

Superman 1 Superman 2 Superman 3 Superman 4 Superman 5 Superman 6 Superman 7 Superman 8

The story of Moses

 

Thor

photo 1 photo 2 photo 3 photo 4 photo 5 photo 6 photo 7 photo 8 photo 9 photo 10 photo 11


Thor myth

 

Wonder Woman

Diana

hyppolite

Sensation Comics #1

WW Sensation Comics #1 page 1 WW Sensation Comics #1 page 2 WW Sensation Comics #1 page 3 WW Sensation Comics #1 page 4 WW Sensation Comics #1 page 5

All Star Comics #8

WW All Star Comics #8 page 1 WW All Star Comics #8 page 2 WW All Star Comics #8 page 3 WW All Star Comics #8 page 4 WW All Star Comics #8 page 5

Wonder Woman 101

photo 1 photo 2 photo 4 photo 5

The Thing

Rabbi Loeb and the Golem of Prague

Thing_01 Thing_02 Thing_05 Thing_08 Thing_09 Thing_10

Shazam!/Captain Marvel

550633

Shazam1 Shazam2 Shazam3 Shazam4 Shazam5 Shazam6 Shazam7

 

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Freshmen A & B: From legends to superheroes

Today we looked at how older legends became a few of the superheroes we know today. We specifically looked at the three below: Superman, Wonder Woman and Thor.

Also, we looked at the rubric for your first project of the year. Your rough draft is due in a week (9/15/14). Hero creative writing rubric

In a group, students chose either Superman, Wonder Woman and Thor and compared the myth they came from to the superhero we know:

Superman

Action Comics 1

Eco and Superman

Superman (Morrison)

Superman 1 Superman 2 Superman 3 Superman 4 Superman 5 Superman 6 Superman 7 Superman 8

The story of Moses

 

Thor

photo 1 photo 2 photo 3 photo 4 photo 5 photo 6 photo 7 photo 8 photo 9 photo 10 photo 11


Thor myth

 

Wonder Woman

 

Diana

hyppolite

Sensation Comics #1

 

WW Sensation Comics #1 page 1 WW Sensation Comics #1 page 2 WW Sensation Comics #1 page 3 WW Sensation Comics #1 page 4 WW Sensation Comics #1 page 5

All Star Comics #8

WW All Star Comics #8 page 1 WW All Star Comics #8 page 2 WW All Star Comics #8 page 3 WW All Star Comics #8 page 4 WW All Star Comics #8 page 5

Wonder Woman 101

photo 1 photo 2 photo 4 photo 5

 

At the end of class we made a chart that compared the myths/legends to today’s heroes. Use these stories to help you figure out what kind of hero you’ll want to create a story around.

Freshman A: Legends

After we’ve discovered why we tell myths and folktales, today we looked at legends by reading stories like Rip Van Winkle, John Henry, the vanishing hitchiker and the first Superman comic (which you can read here).

(If the Superman link doesn’t open, you can download it here: Action Comics 1.)

First, we talked about modern day legends. People like Mohammad Ali, Martin Luther King, Jr., Babe Ruth, etc. were all brought up.

We started off listing some legends that we know, discovering that legends follow the events of real people who did real things, even if they’re really exaggerated (like John Henry, Babe Ruth or even Santa Claus).

As we read one of the stories we answered the following questions:

1) Describe the main character of this legend. What makes him/her “legendary”?

2) How is the story told that makes it sound like it’s a true story, or at least based on some truth? Quote a section of the story that reads like it’s telling you a fact about someone or some place.

3) Where does this legend take place? How do you know?

4) How does the story reflect the place, time period and/or characteristics of its setting? Give specific examples.

Freshman B: Legends

After we’ve discovered why we tell myths and folktales, today we looked at legends by reading stories like Rip Van Winkle, John Henry, the vanishing hitchiker and the first Superman comic (which you can read here).

(If the Superman link doesn’t open, you can download it here: Action Comics 1.)

We started off listing some legends that we know, discovering that legends follow the events of real people who did real things, even if they’re really exaggerated (like John Henry, Babe Ruth or even Santa Claus).

As we read one of the stories we answered the following questions:

1) Describe the main character of this legend. What makes him/her “legendary”?

2) How is the story told that makes it sound like it’s a true story, or at least based on some truth? Quote a section of the story that reads like it’s telling you a fact about someone or some place.

3) Where does this legend take place? How do you know?

4) How does the story reflect the place, time period and/or characteristics of its setting? Give specific examples.